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The Origins of Genome Architecture

I was really excited to find in my mail yesterday a copy of Michael Lynch's new book, The Origins of Genome Architecture, just-published by Sinauer. This book represents a synthetic detailing of Mike's ideas about evolutionary principles that underlie the origin and diversification of genomes. It is very likely to become a classic in evolutionary biology. Last year, Mike published a seminal paper entitled The origins of eukaryotic gene structure in Molecular Biology & Evolution that is a precis of sorts on this topic. I am generally a big fan of his ideas, although they are not without detractors.

In full-disclosure mode, I should point out that I provided some comments to Mike on one of the chapters, resulting in the complementary book (thanks, Mike & Sinauer!). However, I have not yet had the opportunity to consider the whole book. I'll need to add it to my ever-lengthening list!

6 comments:

  1. I've been a fan of Lynch's work for some time (yours, too, actually). I'm definitely ordering this book.

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  2. Thanks for posting this. How did you order the book? Have you written any books yourself?

    How many books do your ead in a year?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Although the book was provided to me gratis (as thanks for me making comments), it can be ordered directly from Sinauer Press. I included the link to the publisher in my posting. I suspect that you can get the book from other book stores too.

    I have never written a book. Papers are hard enough for me to finish writing. ;-} Perhaps some day.

    As for how many books I read in a year... I have never kept track!

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  4. I ordered it through Amazon. Even though it said the book wouldn't be available until June, I've already received my copy.

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  5. If you've read it, would you mind writing a review of it? Thinking of getting it, but it'd be nice to read a bit about it first.

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  6. I haven't finished reading it yet, but I note that Dan Hartl has a recently-published review of the book in Nature Genetics. I don't know if the review is Open Acess or not. RPM over at Evolgen has a nice post on the topic here.

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